Smashing Boxes Schools Durham in Code - 1

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Students at The Iron Yard code school, powered by Smashing Boxes, took on some compelling projects during the fall semester of code school in Durham. They chronicled the learnings and developments at a mid-December pitch night before potential employers.

Because many startups out there are hiring, and many investors are curious about the talent and ideas in this region, we've got their pitches below. These students make up class two of Ruby on Rails Engineering. Most students in class one, which graduated in August, have found jobs and are busy practicing their new skills in the workplace.

Check out the pitches:

Ramblethru is a travel app that consolidates travel searches and builds trip itineraries in app, so when you're looking for a hotel, flight and activities on a trip, you don't have to open multiple tabs. 

Credit: Ryan Timms

Civic Compass makes it easy for citizens to learn about their elected officials, providing data about votes in Congress, the influence of those votes, how the candidate compares to others in Congress and financial contributions to their elections. It's all searchable by zip code.

Credit: Ryan Timms
 
Built for SEEDS, the educational community garden in Durham, the Clipboard app allows nonprofit organizations to track volunteers and volunteer hours using a check-in tool. It's also integrated with Salesforce. (Check out student David Perry's blog on Medium for more about his experience with this project.)

Credit: Ryan Timms
 
Lunchpad is an online platform for parents to order and pay for school lunches that are ordered from outside, simplifying the tracking and payment process for school administrators. 

Credit: Ryan Timms
 
Smart Shopper is an Android app that lets you create a shopping list by scanning barcodes. 

Credit: Ryan Timms

Word Lattice is an iOS game that makes digital the game Word Ladder created by the author of Alice in Wonderland in 1877. Cool thing here, the student taught himself all new skills for the project (not taught during the three months). 

Credit: Ryan Timms